UK Dacia Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Quiz for Bright People

There are only nine questions.

This is a quiz for people who know everything!
I found out in a hurry that I didn't. These are not trick questions.
They are straight questions with straight answers..

1. Name the one sport in which neither the spectators nor the participants know the score or the leader until the contest ends.

2. What famous North American landmark is constantly moving backward?

3 Of all vegetables, only two can live to produce on their own for several growing seasons. All other vegetables must be replanted every year. What are the only two perennial vegetables?

4. What fruit has its seeds on the outside?

5. In many liquor stores, you can buy pear brandy, with a real pear inside the bottle. The pear is whole and ripe, and the bottle is genuine; it hasn't been cut in any way. How did the pear get inside the bottle?

6. Only three words in standard English begin with the letters ' dw' and they are all common words. Name two of them.

7. There are 14 punctuation marks in English grammar. Can you name at least half of them?

8. Name the only vegetable or fruit that is never sold frozen, canned, processed, cooked, or in any other form except fresh.

9. Name 6 or more things that you can wear on your feet beginning with the letter 'S.'

sure you want to see the answers ???????

Answers To Quiz:

1. The one sport in which neither the spectators nor the participants know the score or the leader until the contest ends: Boxing.

2. North American landmark constantly moving backward: Niagara Falls .. The rim is worn down about two and a half feet each year because of the millions of gallons of water that rush over it every minute.

3. Only two vegetables that can live to produce on their own for several growing seasons: Asparagus and rhubarb.

4. The fruit with its seeds on the outside: Strawberry.

5. How did the pear get inside the brandy bottle? It grew inside the bottle. The bottles are placed over pear buds when they are small, and are wired in place on the tree. The bottle is left in place for the entire growing season. When the pears are ripe, they are snipped off at the stems.

6. Three English words beginning with dw: Dwarf, dwell and dwindle...

7. Fourteen punctuation marks in English grammar: Period, comma, colon, semicolon, dash, hyphen, apostrophe, question mark, exclamation point, quotation mark, brackets, parenthesis, braces, and ellipses.

8. The only vegetable or fruit never sold frozen, canned, processed, cooked, or in any other form but fresh: Lettuce.

9. Six or more things you can wear on your feet beginning with 'S': Shoes, socks, sandals, sneakers, slippers, skis, skates, snowshoes, stockings, stilts.

Ralph
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What's the biggest thing a blue whale can swallow?

a) A very large mushroom

b) A small family car

c) A grapefruit

d) A sailor

A grapefruit.
Quite interestingly, a blue whale's throat is almost exactly the same diameter as its belly button (which is about the size of a side plate), but a little smaller than its eardrum (which is more the size of a dinner plate).
For eight months of the year, blue whales eat virtually nothing, but during the summer they feed almost continuously, scooping up three tons of food a day. As you may remember from biology lessons, their diet consists of tiny, pink, shrimp-like crustaceans called krill, which slip down a treat. Krill come conveniently served in huge swarms that can weigh over 100,000 tons.
The word krill is Norwegian. It comes from the Dutch word kriel, meaning 'small fry' but now also used to mean both pygmies and 'small potatoes'. Krill sticks have been marketed with reasonable success in Chile but krill mince was a bit of a disaster in Russia, Poland and South Africa owing to dangerously high levels of fluoride. It came from the krill's shells which were too small to pick off individually before mincing.
The narrow gauge of a blue whale's throat means it couldn't have swallowed Jonah. The only whale with a throat wide enough to swallow a person whole is the sperm whale and, once inside, the intense acidity of the sperm whale's stomach juices would make survival impossible.

Ralph
 

·
amazing, just amazing!
Joined
·
2,926 Posts
Yeah! bloody Chinese can't grow a proper lettuce :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,832 Posts
Yes but its pak choi not proper Lettuce

B)

Ralph
Actually it's lettuce not Pak Choi.

China is the worlds largest producer and eater of lettuce (About half the lettuce grown is grown and eaten in China), but very little of it is eaten as a fresh salad. [1]

We eat the young leaves, but if you let it grow it grows tall on stalks, the Chinese grow it like this and use the stalks as a cooked vegetable, and they also can it.
 

·
amazing, just amazing!
Joined
·
2,926 Posts
Well you learn something new every day :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
and today's quiz ..........

What man-made artefacts can be seen from the moon?

Deduct ten points if you said the Great Wall of China.

No human artefacts at all can be seen from the moon with the naked eye.
The idea that the Great Wall is the 'only man-made object that can be seen from the moon' is all-pervasive, but it confuses 'the moon' with space.
'Space' is quite close. It starts about 100 km (60 miles) from the Earth's surface. From there, many artificial objects are visible: motorways, ships on the sea, railways, cities, fields of crops, and even some individual buildings.
However, at an altitude of only a few thousand miles after leaving the Earth's orbit, no man-made objects are visible at all. From the moon - over 400,000 km (some 250,000 miles) away - even the continents are barely visible.
And, despite Trivial Pursuit telling you otherwise, there is no point in between the two where 'only' the Great Wall of China is visible.

Ralph
 

·
Duster Forum Moderator
Joined
·
1,117 Posts
Good quiz!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Which of these are Chinese inventions?

a) Glass

b) Rickshaws

c) Chop suey

d) Fortune cookies

Chop suey. There are many fanciful stories about its American origin but it is a Chinese dish.
In E. N. Anderson's definitive The Food of China (1988), chop suey is named as a dish local to Toisan in southern Canton. They called it tsap seui, which means 'miscellaneous scraps' in Cantonese. Most of the early immigrants to California came from this region, hence its early appearance in America.
Glass isn't Chinese: the earliest-known glass artefacts are from ancient Egypt in 1350 BC. The earliest Chinese porcelain dates from the Han dynasty (206 BC-AD 220). Ancient China built a whole culture on porcelain, but they never got to grips with transparent glass. This is sometimes used to explain the fact that they never had a scientific revolution comparable with the one in the West, which was made possible by the development of lenses and transparent glassware.
The rickshaw was invented by an American missionary, Jonathan Scobie, who first used it to wheel his invalid wife through the streets of Yokohama in Japan in 1869.
Fortune cookies are also American, though they were probably invented by a Japanese immigrant, Makato Hagiwara, a landscape designer who created the Golden Gate tearoom in San Francisco. He served small, sweet Japanese buns with thank-you notes inside from about 1907 onwards. Restaurant owners in the city's Chinatown copied them and the notes soon started to tell fortunes.
But who's complaining? Chinese resourcefulness has given us: the abacus, bells, brandy, the calendar, the compass, the crossbow, the decimal system, drilling for oil, fireworks, the fishing reel, the flamethrower, the flush toilet, gunpowder, the helicopter, the horse collar, the iron plough, the kite, lacquer, magic mirrors, matches, the mechanical clock, miniature hot-air balloons, negative numbers, paper, parachutes, porcelain, printmaking, relief maps, rudders, seismographs, silk, stirrups, the suspension bridge, the umbrella, the water pump and the wheelbarrow.PHILL Was the rickshaw invented by a bloke called Rick Shaw?

Ralph
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
What does a St Bernard carry round its neck?

St Bernards have never, ever carried brandy barrels.
The dog's mission is entirely teetotal - apart from anything else giving brandy to someone with hypothermia is a disastrous mistake - but tourists have always loved the idea, so they still pose wearing them.
Before they were trained as mountain rescue dogs, they were used by the monks at the hospice in the Great St Bernard Pass - the Alpine route that links Switzerland to Italy - to carry food, as their large size and docile temperament made them good pack animals.
The brandy barrel was the idea of a young English artist named Sir Edwin Landseer (1802-73), who was much favoured by Queen Victoria. He was a renowned painter of landscapes and animals, best known for his painting The Monarch of the Glen and for sculpting the lions around the base of Nelson's Column.
In 1831, he painted a scene called Alpine Mastiffs Reanimating a Distressed Traveller featuring two St Bernards, one of them carrying a miniature brandy barrel around its neck, which he added 'for interest'. St Bernards have been saddled with the association ever since. Landseer is also credited with popularising the name St Bernard (rather than Alpine Mastiff) for the breed.
Originally, St Bernards were known as Barry hounds, a corruption of the German Bären, meaning 'bears'. One of the first lifesavers was known as 'Barry the Great', who rescued forty people between 1800 and 1814 but was unfortunately killed by the forty-first, who mistook him for a wolf.
Barry was stuffed and now has pride of place in the Natural History Museum in Berne. In his honour, the best male pup from each litter at the St Bernard's Hospice is named Barry.
Sometimes, the Hospice's duty to provide food and shelter for all who ask can prove troublesome. One night in 1708, Canon Vincent Camos had to provide food for over 400 travellers. To save manpower, he had a device built like a large hamster-wheel attached to a spit. Inside, a St Bernard trotted along turning the meat skewer.
It's estimated the dogs have made over 2,500 rescues since 1800, though none at all in the last fifty years. As a result, the monastery has decided to sell them off and replace them with helicopters.

Ralph
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Where do most tigers live?

The USA.
A century ago, there were about 40,000 tigers in India. Now there are between 3,000 and 4,700. Some scientists estimate that there are only between 5,100 and 7,500 wild tigers left on the planet.
On the other hand, there are thought to be 4,000 tigers living in captivity in Texas alone. The American Zoo and Aquarium Association estimate that up to 12,000 tigers are being kept as private pets in the USA. Mike Tyson personally owns four of them.
Part of the reason for America's enormous tiger population relates to legislation. Only nineteen states have banned private ownership of tigers, fifteen require only a licence, and sixteen states have no regulations at all.
They're not particularly expensive either. A tiger cub will set you back a mere $1,000 while $3,500 will buy you a pair of Bengal tigers; $15,000 is enough for a fashionable blue-eyed white tiger.
Ironically, it is the success of breeding programmes at American zoos and circuses that has driven this. An overabundance of cubs in the 1980s and 90s brought the prices right down. The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals estimate that there are now 500 lions, tigers and other big cats in private ownership just in the Houston area.

Ralph
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top