UK Dacia Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Can anyone explain the advice given on page 5.36 of the Duster handbook regarding being towed. I can't figure out why none of the wheels must be in contact with the ground when being towed! My Duster is the 63 plate Laureate 1.5 dCi 110 5dr 4x4. According to the blurb, whether I have the selector switch in, 2, 4, or auto mode, the car must be on a transporter if being recovered & not towed, even with a rigid towing bar, otherwise mechanical damage could result. Looking at this advice in a different context, if you free wheel in neutral, which is what the situation would be when being towed, the same damage could occur. I've never come across this advice before. :unsure:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
751 Posts
Its probably to ensure no possibility of additional damage could occur, for example you may assume that the breakdown is caused by condition A but in fact its condition B and by towing the car you actually make condition B worse.

Essentially, if its broken get it taken somewhere with as little use of the car as possible as to avoid further/additional damage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I can't figure out how you can 'tow' a car with all 4 wheels off the ground !!!!!!!!
Yeah right, wrong choice of words there, insert recovered, delete towed. :D

If it's anything that is not transmission related, (breakdown chappies could ascertain that) like electrical failure on the engine circuits, none start etc, with the gearbox in neutral, I don't see a problem with towing, albeit with a fixed tow bar. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,786 Posts
I would imagine that info will cover the automatic version if there is one? I think generally during 2 wheel lift it would be in neutral, if all 4 wheels are down I think you stick it in 3rd to help with slowing down.
Probably wrong mind, but i think when our c max was taken away the guy in our car had it in some gear, it was making a whine noise down our street as it was dragged away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
I'm not sure of the reason for this either but Dacia's advice relates to the 4x4 only and the same advice is common to many 4x4 vehicles so I guess it's something to do with the transmission. As it is an unknown I just wouldn't risk it in case it adds more than a few £££s to the repair bill.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,786 Posts
I got that wrong, didn't read the 4x4 bit I don't think a 4x4 can be towed without fiddling with the transmission, I'm guessing it'll have a prop shaft no?
Even in neutral it'll still spin which may damage it.
I'm not really up on the 4x4 thing, but I'm guessing it'll damage it.
Let the breakdown company take care of it, that's what they're there for... I've seen plenty of new cars lately being picked up at roadside, including my neighbors new meriva that's done more miles on the back of a truck than on the road itself .looks like business is booming.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Have we any techies on here who could explain why a 4x4 can't be towed? Does this also apply to free-wheeling - there is nothing in the handbook saying not to do that.
 

·
amazing, just amazing!
Joined
·
2,926 Posts
All four wheels off the ground towing = front of the vehicle on the tow vehicle, rear on a dolly of some kind :)

There's possibility of damage to the 4x4 transmission if the wheels are turning while being towed because the lubricating fluid is not being distributed properly. Apparently the Landy LT95 has to have it's prop shaft disconnected before it can be towed wheels down. So t'internet tells me anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,786 Posts
In the words of an ex rss breakdown recovery guy who now works at our place (sugarcoated and some words removed for the younger Viewers, and there was more but he went off into a rant of technicalities ) you can't tow a 4x4 on the ground because you'll #*+# the diff, something about a wind up effect???? apparently some have a box (can't remember the name of it)on the axle which disconnects the drive if they have freewheeling hubs they usually have this? , so you can collect on an a frame (I think, the ones with 2 wheels raised????) they always used flat beds for 4x4 collection.
I'm stumped, I lost him at flatbed :-o
He's not a mechanic, only qualified for basic roadside repairs, but he said 100% all 4x4s he collected went on flatbeds, More than half of the ones collected being range rovers :-D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Have we any techies on here who could explain why a 4x4 can't be towed? Does this also apply to free-wheeling - there is nothing in the handbook saying not to do that.
I said that ;) But free wheeling wont be in the handbook, because it's really, really, really, frowned on. But is it illegal?

The towing question seems to be answered, thanks Carlos, but what about free wheeling, whether it's naughty or not, does the same apply, would it bu**er up the transmission?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,786 Posts
I said that ;) But free wheeling wont be in the handbook, because it's really, really, really, frowned on. But is it illegal?
The towing question seems to be answered, thanks Carlos, but what about free wheeling, whether it's naughty or not, does the same apply, would it bu**er up the transmission?
I'll ask him on mon when I'm back at work on mon, I'm not sure but if it's the case for 4x4s.
I'm guessing free wheeling with the engine running will be ok, otherwise every gearchange would be destructive to the transmission?
I know when your towing any car your not supposed to go above 20mph, not sure what that's about either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
As said above you don't want to wind-up the 4x4 system. As the front and rear wheels are connected if they do not turn in unison then the drive train is stressed, due to the variation in rotational velocity. It's the same reason that most 4x4s have a fulltime four wheel drive with difflock that can only be used on loose surfaces at slow speed; if used on tarmac and the wheels do not turn together the drivetrain gets stressed and the driveshafts and propshaft could actually get twisted beyond their designed torsional limits (very harmful to CV joints).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
As said above you don't want to wind-up the 4x4 system. As the front and rear wheels are connected if they do not turn in unison then the drive train is stressed, due to the variation in rotational velocity. It's the same reason that most 4x4s have a fulltime four wheel drive with difflock that can only be used on loose surfaces at slow speed; if used on tarmac and the wheels do not turn together the drivetrain gets stressed and the driveshafts and propshaft could actually get twisted beyond their designed torsional limits (very harmful to CV joints).
Mate has a glorious sierra cosworth 4wd and few years ago needed recovery. He nearly had a fight with the aa man who insisted he could tow it with 2 wheels off the ground! As stated because a 4wd has interlinked transmission and shafts, spinning one axle while holding the other stationary is not good! Thankfully his cossie is still in one piece i just wish he would sell it! 4wd onto a flatbed is the best advice ive heard

vroom vroom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
I know when your towing any car your not supposed to go above 20mph, not sure what that's about either.
That's probably a wise precaution to apply a 20mph limit given the very short stopping distance available to the car being towed on the end of the tow rope. Outside of the 30 or 40mph limit zones, the legal towing speed for trailers, caravans etc is 50mph on single carriageway roads, and 60mph on dual carriageways and motorways.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top