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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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Mine carries out a regen every 4-500 miles and I've covered 6500 now, hardly noticeable in the Sandero, runs a little bit rough and the economy drops on the computer but very little to notice unlike other cars I have had, the Nissan with the same engine had the same little difference.
 

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With all due respect you are wrong in some models, take the ASX for instance, they have a problem of the sump filling with diesel when carrying out a regen, that is not a driving style issue but a design flaw and there are other models with major issues but yes driving styles does effect it along with clogging of the egr valve and poor grade fuels
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Mine carries out a regen every 4-500 miles and I've covered 6500 now, hardly noticeable in the Sandero, runs a little bit rough and the economy drops on the computer but very little to notice unlike other cars I have had, the Nissan with the same engine had the same little difference.
Do you see any smoke /lights on dash? When was 1st one - covered just over 3k so would have expected 1st one by now.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
because they are not driven right as they should be

its different from the petrol driving style

more revs is a good thing prevents soot accumulation turbo clogs egr failure
So which is best during regen - I normally cruise in 5th at 70-75 mph on motorway which equates to just under 2500 RPM - in 4th I cannot really dwadle along at 60 in slow lane.......
 

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So which is best during regen - I normally cruise in 5th at 70-75 mph on motorway which equates to just under 2500 RPM - in 4th I cannot really dwadle along at 60 in slow lane.......
the regen is made automatic when the sensors senses that it needs to

what u are describing is very good and normal

but getting to that speed should be done this way :..every time u change gear rev up above 2500revs up to 3000 revs (in this range the turbo engages the egr opens less soot accumulates)

turbocharges and the egr valve those inside have some flanges, when soot accumulates to much do to low rev driving those flanges get stuck resulting in bad engine running hence the need to rev up the diesel engine

the diesel is more oily than petrol doesn't burn with the same intensity like the high octane petrol that is why it creates soot :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
 

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No you get no indication except fuel economy going down, you will have had several by now, some systems smoke but this one does not
In OTHER WORDS..... NO BIG DEAL!

I think this issue should be pinned to the forum somewhere because I am sure as more and more newbies jump on the Dacia bandwagon all will be concerned about the prospect of sudden system meltdown during DPF regen....

:blink: :blink:
 

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The usual way it works is the DPF blocks with soot and the ECU reads pressure measuring sensors before and after the DPF system therefore seeing the blockage as a diiference in pressure readings.

The difference can be measured as a percentage, 40% 50% 60% etc, at some % a regen will be demanded by the ECU.

Anyone familiar with scangauge type devices which plug into the OBDII port and give readouts on an LCD display while you are driving?

It cannot be long before someone figures out how to get a Scangauge type device to interrogate the OBDII port to read the DPF status ,

Then the driver can keep an eye on the DPF and know when the regen is due, in process, or simply the car needs an essential blast of speed to clear the system out
 

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the regen is made automatic when the sensors senses that it needs to

what u are describing is very good and normal

but getting to that speed should be done this way :..every time u change gear rev up above 2500revs up to 3000 revs (in this range the turbo engages the egr opens less soot accumulates)

turbocharges and the egr valve those inside have some flanges, when soot accumulates to much do to low rev driving those flanges get stuck resulting in bad engine running hence the need to rev up the diesel engine

the diesel is more oily than petrol doesn't burn with the same intensity like the high octane petrol that is why it creates soot :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
You have mentioned diesel driving style (as above) before Andrew, but I have been skipping gears on a 6-speed box to keep the average revs down (e.g. 1st/2nd/4th/6th or any other combination conditions will allow) for the last 10+ years on a petrol and it's a difficult habit to get out of. (Apart from the assumed extra fuel economy, the old Punto was still on it's original clutch @ 142k miles - I can't quite believe it myself, but I really cannot recall a clutch change. Oh, and I always depressed the clutch on the Punto before turning the engine over: I know there are different oppinions on that, but it's what the manual said and I'm finding that habit difficult to kick also!)

Not sure where I'm going with this: maybe to just test for any forum reaction.

[In passing though; I'm at 640 mls on the tacho (so still in low-revs run-in mode). If a regen has been initiated already, I didn't notice anything.]
 

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I haven't noticed anything... I'm currently running at almost 4000 miles on the diesel Sandero, but I do a lot of varied driving and hit 70mph almost every day.
 

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Hi everyone. Posted for the first time earlier on. My sandero stepway has done 22.5k miles only to have a near catastrophic DPF problem. Needs a forced regeneration now at a cost of £250. Apparently not under warranty ????????
 
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