UK Dacia Forum banner
1 - 20 of 53 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, picked up sandero Sunday, was passing dealers today, went in to seek advice on eco button, eh got told just press it, When do I use it???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
As I understand it, the ECO button changes how the engine runs.

It basically takes a bit of oomph away and you get better distance for your fuel.

I drive with it on pretty much all the time and only take it off when I need a bit more oomph, motorway driving or overtaking etc.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
886 Posts
Eco can be used anytime you don't think you will want maximum performance.
Off gives the priority to performance
On gives the priority to economy.

I'm still learning too but I believe the shift light comes on at a different point between the two settings. I've no idea if it runs a completely different fuel map or not but I suspect it does but please don't take that as gospel.

Play about with it and see if you notice any performance/ financial gains. Might not be too noticeable during the running in period as you'll be keeping the revs down just now anyway.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
759 Posts
On my wifes Sandero 0.9 you can certainly notice the difference, the acceleration is cut quite considerably with eco on but strangely you don't seem to suffer with quite as bigger lag on the second gear pick up?

So conversely to what I thought would make sense we tend to run with the eco on on motorway etc when cruising and turn it off for getting around towns when you need proper acceleration for roundabouts and junctions etc

Running in period? My belief is that today's engines are manufactured to tolerances where running in is a thing of the past, if not whoops for our two Dacia's
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
535 Posts
On my wifes Sandero 0.9 you can certainly notice the difference, the acceleration is cut quite considerably with eco on but strangely you don't seem to suffer with quite as bigger lag on the second gear pick up?

So conversely to what I thought would make sense we tend to run with the eco on on motorway etc when cruising and turn it off for getting around towns when you need proper acceleration for roundabouts and junctions etc

Running in period? My belief is that today's engines are manufactured to tolerances where running in is a thing of the past, if not whoops for our two Dacia's
What did you do with the manuals? :lol: There is recommended a run in period.
 

·
amazing, just amazing!
Joined
·
2,926 Posts
No Fair!! I want an ECO button!

Ref running in, if you drive your car often it doesn't take long for the miles to disappear :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: eithnew

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Isn't everything engine at the factory given that extremely high rpm run in before their fitted though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
449 Posts
It is strange that everyone I have mentioned 'running in' to reacts in the same way.. You don't do that with engines anymore and to be fair my parents have just taken delivery of an i20 and they asked the dealer if it needed doing and they said no. All the manual states is that it's advisory to run the car at between 2000-4000rpm for the first 600 miles. Can only assume this is another cost save on Dacias part as surely running an engine either in or out of the vehicle is going to use fuel? Fuel = cost..

Taking it easy for a few hundred miles in my mind allows for other components to bed in too so makes sense..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
759 Posts
What did you do with the manuals? :lol: There is recommended a run in period.
Isn't everything engine at the factory given that extremely high rpm run in before their fitted though.
Normally are bench run
It is strange that everyone I have mentioned 'running in' to reacts in the same way.. You don't do that with engines anymore and to be fair my parents have just taken delivery of an i20 and they asked the dealer if it needed doing and they said no. All the manual states is that it's advisory to run the car at between 2000-4000rpm for the first 600 miles. Can only assume this is another cost save on Dacias part as surely running an engine either in or out of the vehicle is going to use fuel? Fuel = cost..

Taking it easy for a few hundred miles in my mind allows for other components to bed in too so makes sense..
Manuals? I'm a bloke so I never open them unless I'm really stuck on how something should work :rolleyes:

Reaper your comment reminded me of when I worked for a company that supplied seats for the BMW mini, I had a site tour of the cowley works and every mini that comes off of the line is driven straight onto a rolling road and thrashed to full power where its max BHP reading is displayed, they were very proud that some cooper works models where making 225BHP at the wheels, running in it isn't.

I agree with the taking it easy comment, but I think that's stands up when you drive any vehicle that you haven't previously driven, as it gives you time to get used to the way the vehicle handles.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,815 Posts
Ninecheries u are spot on

They are bench run but guys its one thing to benchmark an engine on a bench
Totaly the other running it into the car with 1200kg body plus passangers plus luggage

The components need to SETTLE IN so why its so hard for some to comprehend this
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Manuals? I'm a bloke so I never open them unless I'm really stuck on how something should work :rolleyes:

Reaper your comment reminded me of when I worked for a company that supplied seats for the BMW mini, I had a site tour of the cowley works and every mini that comes off of the line is driven straight onto a rolling road and thrashed to full power where its max BHP reading is displayed, they were very proud that some cooper works models where making 225BHP at the wheels, running in it isn't.

I agree with the taking it easy comment, but I think that's stands up when you drive any vehicle that you haven't previously driven, as it gives you time to get used to the way the vehicle handles.
I just remember as a kid being taken to the Ford Factory tour in Dagenham and remember seeing how they bench ran each engine that came off the line and in a sealed chamber in case they explode.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
I run mostly on ECO mode. I find the Sandero easier to control in ECO mode. The diesel Sandero does 70mph at just under 2000 revs.

But I run the diesel engine in for the first 3000 miles in standard mode, not going above 2500 revs. And to be honest, I hardly ever go over 3000 revs during normal use anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
The torque on the diesel makes it easy to drive under the 2-2.5k although our resident expert says we should drive it up to the 3k all the time!!

Can't afford to do that as I would be getting speeding tickets after 2nd gear lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
I can second this. Even with ECO off and me being frivolous with my fuel, haven't gotten past 3,000 before thinking "I should change gear".
Yep... same here.

The torque on the diesel makes it easy to drive under the 2-2.5k although our resident expert says we should drive it up to the 3k all the time!!

Can't afford to do that as I would be getting speeding tickets after 2nd gear lol
For sure, the Sandero diesel engine has a load of acceleration, even under 3000 revs.

I've pulled away quickly at a busy traffic island and found myself gaining way too much ground on the car just leaving the island. It's a small car with a large engine at the end of the day.... so it will do almost anything you ask of it.

I had a motorbike behind me last night on a winding lane, that goes up a steep hill. He was riding right up my backside, and the temptation to switch off the ECO mode was too much.... I changed down a gear and the Sandero took off up the hill like a sports car. It went from about 40mph to 60mph up to the top of the hill, and when I looked in the mirror the motorbike was about 400 yards behind.

I exaggerate not. :mellow: The Sandero diesel is a serious piece of kit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
"The Sandero diesel is a serious bit of kit" - rolling in the isles, ha-ha, who's he think he's kidding ....

But hang on a minute. My wife and I have both experienced the car "running away with you" syndrome especially when exiting corners.

Yes, the "eco" button stunts performance considerably while, according to what I have read, reducing the aircon and other things that would otherwise consume energy (fuel).

Now, I am reliably informed that the 1.5 diesel Sandero will do 85 mph at 2500 rpm and seems to run quite quietly under those conditions. AND the car will accelerate like a scolded cat if you get the gear/revs right with the Eco button switched off.

I kind of agree with the above:

Motorways - Eco Button On - Cruise Set to Your Speed.

In town - Eco Button On - Speed Limiter set to 30 mph (or what is the limit).

Winding A Roads - Eco Button Off - Speed Limiter set to 60 mph (or the limit) - makes best use of point-and-squirt and leaves maximum power available for overtaking.

These ways of doing things incidentally have resulted in our 1700-mile-clock Sandero doing some 58 mpg on its DERV. I hope it gets a bit better with time but won't complain if it doesn't.

Re. Running in - read the handbook - - - - - run in for 950 miles etc. TUT - us blokes should read instructions.

PS - I plan to get the oil/oil filter changed on mine around 2000 miles when, in my view it might be a bit "run in". I've had these early oil changes with all my previous "new" cars and believe it has to be a good thing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
759 Posts
Ours is the petrol Sandero 0.9, so goes well past 3,000 rpm, I didn't know the diesel even had an eco button. Also it was the ex demo so will have been carefully run in for us LOL. I get about 42 mpg from it, but the wife only gets 37 mpg (short journeys and slower roads)

My diesel duster as with your results above rarely goes past 3,000. There's no point as the power is from about 1,900 - 2,500
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,815 Posts
The torque on the diesel makes it easy to drive under the 2-2.5k although our resident expert says we should drive it up to the 3k all the time!!

Can't afford to do that as I would be getting speeding tickets after 2nd gear lol
starting with the 2200 rev the turbo kicks in that is the main thing guys, not to in the long run to get the turbo blocked by not using it

even if u take it to 3000 revs u will still get economy on fuel cos the turbo gets to the engine

more forced clean air along with a bit of unburned fuel gases from the exhaust

that is what the EGR is made for.

quote

In internal combustion engines, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reduction technique used in petrol/gasoline and diesel engines. EGR works by recirculating a portion of an engine's exhaust gasback to the engine cylinders. In a gasoline engine, this inert exhaust displaces the amount of combustible matter in the cylinder. In a diesel engine, the exhaust gas replaces some of the excess oxygen in the pre-combustion mixture.[1]Because NOx forms primarily when a mixture of nitrogen and oxygen is subjected to high temperature, the lower combustion chamber temperatures caused by EGR reduces the amount of NOx the combustion generates (though at some loss of engine efficiency).[2] Most modern engines now require exhaust gas recirculation to meet emissions standards.

unquote

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exhaust_gas_recirculation
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
886 Posts
Interesting reading. Is that gospel about the Eco button affecting air con? I didn't think that was possible, as I thought the compressor etc being mechanical, was either engaged or dis engaged.
 
1 - 20 of 53 Posts
Top