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Bought a brand new 15 plate Logan MCV 1.2 petrol over a month ago , done 1900 miles. first week drive shaft became faulty, took back to dealer they replaced it, then stereo screeches when ever anyone texts me when connected to hands free have to turn it off mid screech its so loud. also always have bbc 5 live on, every single time I swtich radio on it reverts back to radio 2? , the starter motor is making a bearing noise , its booked in to dealer for this. and today the drive shaft has started doing same thing again??? Fed up, totally lost confidence with car. going to look at getting money back for vehicle and buy something else. Anyone had as many issues with so a new car??
 

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Yes, in 98 bought a polo automatic. Within the first 5000 miles the HT leads were shot, the injectors had to be replaced and the exhaust fell off.

Within the first year the indicator stalk snapped off and the automatic gearbox was shot.

If only everything in life was as reliable as a VW...
 

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I've had a Logan for over a year now and not had many issues at all (few suspect tiny spots of rust). Mechanically the car has been fine, not any hint at any issues.

Sounds like you really did get a dud... Is it worth you coming back to Dacia? Well, I'm sure most would understand if you didn't. If a car doesn't feel reliable it's stressful.
 

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Another driveshaft failing, that's very suspect. I have a theory that your car may have been damaged in transit, then poorly repaired causing repeated problems. In any case throw it back at them, the shine has been tarnished on the coveted new car relationship it'll never be the same now. Best to get a replacement.
 

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Ask yourself this. Aside from the reliability issues, do you actually like the car?

If you do, push for a direct replacement, and maybe some free services or something as compensation.

If you don't, push for a full refund.
 

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Yes, in 98 bought a polo automatic. Within the first 5000 miles the HT leads were shot, the injectors had to be replaced and the exhaust fell off.

Within the first year the indicator stalk snapped off and the automatic gearbox was shot.

If only everything in life was as reliable as a VW...
98 polo steering wheel adjustment mechanism broke ( failed welds )
 

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98 polo steering wheel adjustment mechanism broke ( failed welds )
Had to scrap a Y-reg Polo SDi a couple of years back due to a failed pedal box, which was going to cost far more than the car was worth to repair. I later found out the 6N and 6N2 Polo were built in Spain, not Germany as they'd like us to believe.

Never again will I fall into the trap of expecting better from an old VW than an old 'brand x.'
 

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They weren't much cop from new. My parents bought jettas until the third series of golf came out and was clearly inferior. Given VWs are fairly uncomfortable with agricultural gearboxes that should have been warning enough. My experience with VW was so bad that I'll never buy another and I will no longer believe any car reviewer that says they are better build quality.
 

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That`s why when I read cases like , it make me glad I bought second hand with 10,000 miles on the clock. I would hope the first owner would have had all the niggles to sort out for me.
 

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That`s why when I read cases like , it make me glad I bought second hand with 10,000 miles on the clock. I would hope the first owner would have had all the niggles to sort out for me.
Great in theory, but in reality know one really knows what they've bought until it's been used for a while. I sadly have had first hand experience when I bought a second hand car for the wife, all appeared great to start with but it wasn't long before the cracks started appearing.

Yes it's possible to minimise the chances and liability, that's why we buy new or nearly new but with that lower risk factor comes a higher price.

Pays your money, takes your choice and hope for the best. At least with the main dealer you got a fighting chance of getting your money back.
 

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@Skip Yep agree you never can be sure, but I do think first owners getting problems will take em back to get sorted.

The big test for mine is Travel through France to Southern Spain Tuesday, I have the breakdown cover of the vehicle plus my own European one, so I am hoping for the best lol. Gonna get an oil change tomorrow before I leave.
 

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Had a freelander once, most unreliable piece of scrap ever bought, second was a Vitara. I know there is future rust worries on Duster but could never have been as bad as the Suzuki.
 

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Does anyone have any experience of successfully rejecting a car after more than a month, and with 1900 miles on the clock? I seem to remember reading that once you have allowed the car to be repaired, then you are deemed to have lost the option of returning it as 'not fit for purpose'. But two drive shaft failures within 2000 miles definitely sounds like the car itself is somehow 'out of true'. On the other hand, are these cars not front-wheel drive? Do they actually use a drive shaft?
 

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Think you may be confusing prop shaft and drive shafts?

On rear wheel (and 4 wheel) drive cars a prop shaft carries the power from the gear box to the differential at the rear of the car. The drive shaft then takes the power from the differential and delivers it to the rear wheels.

On front wheel drive cars the drive shafts leave the combined gearbox/diff and deliver the power to the front wheels directly.

So yes you have drive shafts, and no they shouldn't be failing after such a low mileage.
 

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Think you may be confusing prop shaft and drive shafts?

On rear wheel (and 4 wheel) drive cars a prop shaft carries the power from the gear box to the differential at the rear of the car. The drive shaft then takes the power from the differential and delivers it to the rear wheels.

On front wheel drive cars the drive shafts leave the combined gearbox/diff and deliver the power to the front wheels directly.

So yes you have drive shafts, and no they shouldn't be failing after such a low mileage.
Thanks for clearing that up for me - we all learn something every day!
 

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Does anyone have any experience of successfully rejecting a car after more than a month, and with 1900 miles on the clock? I seem to remember reading that once you have allowed the car to be repaired, then you are deemed to have lost the option of returning it as 'not fit for purpose'. But two drive shaft failures within 2000 miles definitely sounds like the car itself is somehow 'out of true'. On the other hand, are these cars not front-wheel drive? Do they actually use a drive shaft?
On the contrary, if you have allowed them the opportunity to repair, and the same fault reoccurs, it strengthens your case for rejection.
 

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We rejected our vehicle after putting 600 miles on it and refusing to have rectification work. You have up to 6 months to reject a vehicle but obviously the sooner you can do it the better.

GOOD LUCK

THE TEXT BELOW TAKEN FROM THE MONEY ADVICE SERVICE
If you buy a car that turns out to be faulty, your rights and options largely depend on who you bought it from and how they described the car. You have less legal protection when buying from a private seller or car auction than when buying from a dealer.

Problems with cars bought from dealers

Remember
Contact the dealer as soon as you notice the problem
Try to keep conversations with them as amicable as possible
But keep a record of all your exchanges and make sure any verbal agreements are put in writing
If you buy a new or used car from a dealer and experience problems with it, you have some statutory rights under the Sale of Goods Act 1979.

The Act states that the car must be "of a satisfactory quality", "fit for purpose" and "as described". (For a used car, "satisfactory quality" takes into account the car's age and mileage.)

If the car you bought fails on any of these points within six months, you're entitled to have it repaired or replaced, or to get a partial or full refund.

In fact, you're legally allowed to return it up to six years after you bought it. But it gets more difficult to prove that a fault and not normal wear and tear is the cause of any problem.

Find out more about the Sales of Goods Act on the Which? website

How to get things put right

Here's what to do if you have a problem with a new or used car bought from a dealer:

Contact the dealer as soon as you notice the problem - in person if possible
If the dealer offers to fix the problem, make sure you understand any costs involved. Keep a record of your conversations and correspondence, and get all verbal agreements in writing
If all else fails, you can reject your car as long as you tried to resolve the issue with the dealer first
If you decide to reject the car, you must give the dealer details of your reasons for doing so in writing, and within six months of taking delivery of it
If the dealer refuses to accept your rejection of the car, contact the customer relations department of its manufacturer straight away. They may be able to mediate
For help making your complaint consider using Resolver.co.uk. The Ombudsman Services said "Resolver.co.uk is a free online service and app that offers consumer advice and simplifies the process of complaining."
 
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