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Watching YouTube videos of the Duster, you often see them going through water. Sometimes this can be quite deep, over the bumpers in some cases. This begs the question - where is the air intake?

I read that on my current Citroen Picasso the air intake is very low down so it is bet to avoid going through water if at all possible. Similarly we often see Landrovers with a plastic snorkel. So anybody have a clue where it is on the Duster?

Not that I intend taking my new car swimming you understand, but on last years flooding and living a few miles from Hebden Bridge..................

****

4x4 Laurette in Mariana Blue with Protection & Styling Packs. 3 weeks on Friday?
 

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Hi ****, the wading depth for the 2x4 and 4x4 Duster is 350mm. i have seen some of the videos of the Duster spectacularly splashing in rivers, this can force water up in the engine bay causing damage. I have a small Jimny and the best way to tackle water crossings is to take it slow and make a bow wave which naturally makes the water dip at the front of the car and reducing the water depth .
 

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Thanks for that Duster. 350mm is certainly lower than some of the videos suggest. Where did you get that info from?

****

4x4 Laurette in Mariana Blue with Protection & Styling Packs. 3 weeks on Friday?
 

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I've just seen Palerider's post on the "Stickies" about a snorkel. Funny that should be posted at the same time as my post ;-)

****

4x4 Laurette in Mariana Blue with Protection & Styling Packs. 3 weeks on Friday?
 
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One of the mods I want to look for is a snorkel. I'm sure one must be available somewhere?
 

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Watching YouTube videos of the Duster, you often see them going through water. Sometimes this can be quite deep, over the bumpers in some cases. This begs the question - where is the air intake?

I read that on my current Citroen Picasso the air intake is very low down so it is bet to avoid going through water if at all possible. Similarly we often see Landrovers with a plastic snorkel. So anybody have a clue where it is on the Duster?

Not that I intend taking my new car swimming you understand, but on last years flooding and living a few miles from Hebden Bridge..................

****

4x4 Laurette in Mariana Blue with Protection & Styling Packs. 3 weeks on Friday?
The air intake on my Access 4x4 is very high, above the top of the radiator. Therefore it's unlikely that water will be sucked into the engine even in water deeper than the recommended wading depth of 350mm.
However wading depth does take other factors into account, such as breathers on transmission casings which are lower than the air intake.
 

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The air intake on my Access 4x4 is very high, above the top of the radiator. Therefore it's unlikely that water will be sucked into the engine even in water deeper than the recommended wading depth of 350mm.
However wading depth does take other factors into account, such as breathers on transmission casings which are lower than the air intake.

^ This. Remember working on Vauxhall Fronteras and their Izuzu Trooper alike, back in the early 90's. Biggest issue were boat launchers where the rear end was sitting in the river or sea for ages, while boat was put on or off the trailer. Mods are simple enough though, as the breather unscrewed to be replaced by a threaded fitting with tail on, then fit pipe and run somewhere high - think we used to end the rear ones in the rear pillars somewhere. Be interesting to know the list of issues that kept the wadding depth relatively low on the Duster and how difficult to sort out.

The normal killer is electrics, usually cunningly fitted under the seats or in the footwells, at the lowest point inside the cabin. Genius!!
 

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I've just seen Palerider's post on the "Stickies" about a snorkel. Funny that should be posted at the same time as my post ;-)

****

4x4 Laurette in Mariana Blue with Protection & Styling Packs. 3 weeks on Friday?
Great minds think alike ****
 
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The air intake on my Access 4x4 is very high, above the top of the radiator. Therefore it's unlikely that water will be sucked into the engine even in water deeper than the recommended wading depth of 350mm.
However wading depth does take other factors into account, such as breathers on transmission casings which are lower than the air intake.

^ This. Remember working on Vauxhall Fronteras and their Izuzu Trooper alike, back in the early 90's. Biggest issue were boat launchers where the rear end was sitting in the river or sea for ages, while boat was put on or off the trailer. Mods are simple enough though, as the breather unscrewed to be replaced by a threaded fitting with tail on, then fit pipe and run somewhere high - think we used to end the rear ones in the rear pillars somewhere. Be interesting to know the list of issues that kept the wadding depth relatively low on the Duster and how difficult to sort out.

The normal killer is electrics, usually cunningly fitted under the seats or in the footwells, at the lowest point inside the cabin. Genius!!
I think the electronics box is usually quite water resistant in the footwell, as that is where water goes off snowy boots and spills. but you are absolutely correct about the electrics being the killer.
The alternator may not be needed to generate a spark to plugs on the diesel, but it is part of the electrics circuit and immersion kills it, and it is quite low down on this engine. There are also other electric/electronic gadgets that may have light splash protection but not immersion protection ( a bit like a woolworths watch) Some of these are;
The electrics for the power steering arm ( low) ; the engine management unit; The electronics sensors controlling the fuel injectors, the electric cooling fan in front of the radiator.
The starter motor is also very low and will not survive total immersion.
So all in all, you need a lot more kit and adaptations than a snorkel to be able to go bonnet-deep in water.... virtually a water tight tank around and under the engine,

I think the landrover defenders were designed with all the vulnerable bits a lot higher up than our engine that was originally the inhabitant of renault clios and meganes.

There is an after market under engine protection plate linked elsewhere on these forums. That would probably offer a lot of protection against a short surge or brief passing wave on initially entering the water, though it would still allow th engine copartment to flood quite quickly if immersed too deep for too many seconds.

Having seen some of the PR off-roading on you tube I am quite surprised that no-one ever cracks their rear diff on a rock or pivots over a high point crushing the exhaust and door sills in the process. The suspension links at the rear of the 4x4 look as if they wouldnt much like coming into contact with a high rock either...so I would be cautious about having as much fun as journalists or manufacturers test drivers do in a free demonstrator on you-tube!!
 

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I fancied giving fording a try. I have an Ambiance 4x4.

I went for a couple of fords in Kent, fairly easy ones, unless the water is in spate then it can be interesting. When I arrived, guess what. It was in spate.

These are not my photos as I just did it as a "fancy doing it" en-route home from Go Outdoors. Anyway:

First one:

https://flic.kr/p/4514721825
Then this location:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-cozdZ3DHjvw/UaNN9aNcVQI/AAAAAAAABqo/7LwnvDgAeDM/s1600/IMG_0071.jpg

But it was certainly not like this when I got to it!! I reckon that's got to be a no recent rain for a few weeks. Its pretty much rained and snowed on and off for weeks now. I'm daft but not that daft! So I checked the depth by wading into it a short way. I had my work boots on and could only go about two feet before I would have been mid calf. The water was 'going for it'. I got home and checked the water line where the mud had been washed away. I reckon it was probably just over a foot, so on the limit and about twenty feet from dry to dry.

With hindsight? The car breezed through it, though the rain had certainly deposited a lot of sediment and gravel as I could feel the 4 wheel drive being used.
 
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