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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our Logan was due its first service and when I found out that they wanted to charge almost £200 for what is essentially an oil change I almost died. I've worked on family cars for years and I've worked up quite a collection of tools and skills, however I think if you have the necessary skills to drive a car or follow a cooking recipe, you can also change your oil.

DISCLAIMER:

IF YOU CREATE A PROBLEM AFTER FOLLOWING THIS GUIDE YOU MAY VOID YOUR WARRANTY.

However, if you do it professionally using genuine Renault parts it will be fine. I'm not a professional, I just have experience doing this. Use your best judgement and seek advice from professionals when in doubt.

The process exactly the same on many other Renault products however I am working on the 0.9L TCE engine on a Logan MCV. I believe it is exactly the same process on the Sandero (Stepway too) with the 0.9L engine and very similar on the Renault Captur, Clio and any other application of the H4Bt engine.

I went to the local dealership to get GENUINE parts. I'm mentioning this because in the past I've always used other brands on second hand cars but buying genuine wasn't really much more expensive.

Oil - £28.28

Filter - £10.36

Sump washer - £0.30

Plus VAT on those prices. (correct as of April 2015).

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My Toyota looking out of place amongst the Renaults, Nissans and Dacia.

So I also bought some coolant. This is what everything looks like

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The cartridge style oil filter. This is my first time working on a car that uses this type of filter. Japanese cars tend to use the spin-on ones I guess.

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Engine bay shot

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OK so with the engine stone cold, we can begin...

Raise the vehicle and support with a jack stand. I'm sure people will comment on using a trolley jack etc. In my opinion as long as you support it safely with a stand it doesn't matter what you raise it with.

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Get a bit of carpet or card board to lie on!

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So the Logan has a plastic undertray / splash guard that needs to come off to get access to the sump and the filter. There are eight 10mm bolts holding the undertray on. Take them out and slide the undertray towards the back of the car, it will drop down. It is rather light so its pretty easy.

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These are the 10mm bolts, they are all the same.

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Here is the tray:

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next post cont.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
So with the tray off, you can see everything.. and its all SHINY! A nice change for me lol.

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Black circular thing is the filter housing

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Sump nut

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Fabricate some kind of drain pan using recycled materials (or buy one if you are a torygraph reader)...

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The sump bolt is an 8mm square. The only reason I have this tool is because of an old Renault I worked a few years back. Handy now!

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Remove the drain bolt and catch the spent oil in the pan

Try not to make a mess.

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next post cont.
 

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sump nut:

Shoe Hat Helmet Glove Plastic bottle

Now remove the filter. Its a plastic cartridge housing with a 27mm "nut" on the end. (I think its 27mm, might be smaller)

This bit got very messy

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I made another drain pan for this (this time its a Lenor drain pan) because more oil was draining from both the sump and the filter aperture.

Old filter removed and placed in a plastic bottle half cut

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For that bit, you need to take the filter out of the plastic housing, dispose of the filter, and then to refit, you need to put the fresh filter into the plastic housing.

Once the oil stopped draining, I lowered the car back onto its wheels and let it drain more because sometimes you get more out when its flat.

At this point, with the car on ground and the last few bits of oil draining, its time for a break, go inside and make a cuppa. Or read a book for a few hours. The longer you leave it, the more spent oil will drip out. My break turned into something else and I actually left it overnight lol.

So returning the next day...

With the filter comes a new rubber seal, you need to remove the old rubber seal on the plastic housing using a plastic flat edge (or screwdriver, knife etc.) Slide on the new seal. Lack of photos due to messiness but its easy once you have it at hand.

Put the new paper filter cartridge in the plastic hosing and screw it onto the engine by hand.

Using a torque wrench, tighten it to 25Nm. If you don't have a torque wrench, make it as tight as you think it was when you removed it. Don't over tighten it, its plastic and will crack. Don't make it too loose, it will leak.

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Replace the washer on the sump nut and refit onto the sump if its stopped dripping. I don't have a torque spec for this.

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Get the threads started by hand first, you don't want to cross thread this or you'll be rethreading or replacing the sump. It's soft metal and it will strip. Don't over tighten it either.

Once you are confident the filter and sump nut are on tightly, clean up the mess you've made using some engine degreaser or some other product that is plastic/rubber safe. The reason for this is to keep your engine clean and shiny, dirt sticks to oil, and most importantly, if the area is clean, you will be able to spot leaks much easier in case you didnt put something on properly. I used this product.

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Now we come to filling the engine. The capacity is 4.1L. You won't need that much because draining the sump doesn't allow every last drop to drain out. Think about the oil sitting in other parts of the engine.

At this point, put around 2L of oil in and check for leaks. If there are no leaks, fit the undertray, lower the vehicle and fill the rest of the way.

next post cont.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So fill around 2 L of oil.

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Check for leaks, if there are no leaks, re fit the undertray.

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Lower the vehicle on the ground.

Fill the rest of the way, checking the dipstick. You want to get it close to the full mark but NOT over. If you get it over, drain some oil out via the sump nut.

Once you've reached the correct capacity, start the engine, let it warm up or go for a drive, once the engine has cooled down, check the oil level again and top up if necessary. I would also check the level and check for leaks after a few days of driving.

You will also need to reset the service computer. Cycle through the trip computer until you get to the service miles (indicating by a spanner icon), on that screen, hold the button on the end of the wiper lever until it flashes and returns to the default interval which is 12,500 miles. And you're done!

Stuff I forgot to mention or didn't take photos of:

When refitting the oil filter housing, fill the filter with fresh oil. This is to make sure there is lubrication the first time you start the engine after the oil change.

Also, when you replace the seal on the filter hosing, smear some fresh oil all along the rubber seal.

I forgot to show how much oil came out:

Vehicle Automotive tire Bumper Automotive exterior Motor vehicle

You need to dispose of this responsibly. I put all my spent motor oil in a container and take it to the local refuse site. You might be able to take it back to Renault. Don't put it down the sink. Don't let it drain into surface water. Its harmful for plants, animals and can contaminate drinking supplies. There are rules and regulations and you have a responsibility to find how is best to dispose of it where you live.
 

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An excellent guide, and thankyou for posting this.

One small thing - and I say this as a complete amateur - Would you always recommend changing the oil completely cold? Obviously you don't want to be handling scalding hot oil, but I was always told you should warm the engine somewhat in order to allow it to thin, with a view to getting as much of the old, dirty oil out as possible.

Interested in your thoughts.
 

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Excellent work thanks.
what's the bets the dealer busts, or loses the screws, or the entire plastic undertray... And they say "It was like that when it came in"
I suppose I should have more faith, but but I've been having 'quality' services from main dealers for years, two bad enough they refunded me the price of the service.
 

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miserable old git
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Warm up the engine a bit as warm oil drains better than cold gloopy oil.
 

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You have given Haynes a run for their money.

I would always do an oil change in between dealer services as I don't agree with the long mileage interval they use between services and your walkthrough is excellent.

For me this is the clinker around servicing - How do you prove it has been serviced as there is no stamp on the service book? the dealer or garage can stamp the book but who knows what was done???, but they have validated it and that's all that matters especially when it comes to warranty work.

An owner that looks after their vehicle and services it meticulously using branded parts, but on paper can't 'prove' it will be seen as a chancer .....it's ridiculous.
 

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Dizplay I noticed you used a 1/2" torque wrench to tighten the filter housing to 25nm. Please don't take this as a criticism instead advice on torque wrenches.

As a rule of thumb, torque wrenches are most accurate in the middle of their acceptable range and least accurate at the top and lowest 10%. For example, if a wrench is rated for 20Nm to 200Nm, it's least likely to be accurate below 38Nm and above 188Nm ft-lbs. Of course a well calibrated wrench should be accurate within a certain percentage throughout the whole rated range but you never know! Because of this, an assortment of torque wrenches is a good idea for a well stocked garage. If you were to buy some wrenches, I would suggest a low range one from 0Nm-50Nm and one for about 30Nm-250Nm.
 

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Exactly what I have mainly due to also having two motorcycles to maintain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
An excellent guide, and thankyou for posting this.

One small thing - and I say this as a complete amateur - Would you always recommend changing the oil completely cold? Obviously you don't want to be handling scalding hot oil, but I was always told you should warm the engine somewhat in order to allow it to thin, with a view to getting as much of the old, dirty oil out as possible.

Interested in your thoughts.
There are two schools of thought on this. I personally like to do it with the engine stone cold and leave it to drain longer. Letting the engine warm up causes two effects which I don't like, 1. the oil is hot. 2. the oil has to drain from the top of the of engine which takes longer. This is my opinion and doing it hot/cold is just a matter of preference and shouldn't affect the end result. Consider that when a customer drives several miles to get to the garage it gets hot and I doubt the garage has time to let it fully cool down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Excellent work thanks.
what's the bets the dealer busts, or loses the screws, or the entire plastic undertray... And they say "It was like that when it came in"
I suppose I should have more faith, but but I've been having 'quality' services from main dealers for years, two bad enough they refunded me the price of the service.
Yep! I hardly ever trust other people to work on my cars for this reason. Our recent encounter with a bodyshop is a good example, whilst doing the oil change I noticed paint overspray on one of the headlights... :angry:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You have given Haynes a run for their money.

I would always do an oil change in between dealer services as I don't agree with the long mileage interval they use between services and your walkthrough is excellent.

For me this is the clinker around servicing - How do you prove it has been serviced as there is no stamp on the service book? the dealer or garage can stamp the book but who knows what was done???, but they have validated it and that's all that matters especially when it comes to warranty work.

An owner that looks after their vehicle and services it meticulously using branded parts, but on paper can't 'prove' it will be seen as a chancer .....it's ridiculous.
Thanks!!

I will write my own service in the service book and leave the stamp blank but I will include the receipt to show the quality of the parts I used.

Most times we've sold old cars, people have been understanding enough to consider it as full service history but that's probably because they've also been mechanically minded people. I personally keep my cars forever most of the time so it doesn't really bother me.

This Dacia will probably stay in the family until it becomes uneconomical to repair.

My Yaris has 168,000 miles on it and the previous owner was a friend who looked after it very well.

As for the Dacia warranty, I called the head office and they said as long as I use genuine parts they will honour the warranty. Its worth calling them and asking about this though because it sounds like they made a record of my telephone conversation on their system as they took the vehicle registration and my address.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Dizplay I noticed you used a 1/2" torque wrench to tighten the filter housing to 25nm. Please don't take this as a criticism instead advice on torque wrenches.

As a rule of thumb, torque wrenches are most accurate in the middle of their acceptable range and least accurate at the top and lowest 10%. For example, if a wrench is rated for 20Nm to 200Nm, it's least likely to be accurate below 38Nm and above 188Nm ft-lbs. Of course a well calibrated wrench should be accurate within a certain percentage throughout the whole rated range but you never know! Because of this, an assortment of torque wrenches is a good idea for a well stocked garage. If you were to buy some wrenches, I would suggest a low range one from 0Nm-50Nm and one for about 30Nm-250Nm.
Very good advice, thank you for sharing in a civil way. I didn't know that about losing accuracy at the ends of the range, does that also apply to digital torque wrenches?
 

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Thanks!!

I will write my own service in the service book and leave the stamp blank but I will include the receipt to show the quality of the parts I used.

Most times we've sold old cars, people have been understanding enough to consider it as full service history but that's probably because they've also been mechanically minded people. I personally keep my cars forever most of the time so it doesn't really bother me.

This Dacia will probably stay in the family until it becomes uneconomical to repair.

My Yaris has 168,000 miles on it and the previous owner was a friend who looked after it very well.

As for the Dacia warranty, I called the head office and they said as long as I use genuine parts they will honour the warranty. Its worth calling them and asking about this though because it sounds like they made a record of my telephone conversation on their system as they took the vehicle registration and my address.

That's good to know that Dacia CS are ok with sensible owners looking after their cars properly and will accept the receipts as proof.

I'm just thinking of the money you have saved me as well as the satisfaction in knowing the services were actually carried out (by me)

Cheers !!
 

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Don't know what happened on that last attempt to post :blink: but heh ho ..

That's good to know that Dacia CS are ok with sensible owners looking after their cars properly and will accept the receipts as proof.

I'm just thinking of the money you have saved me as well as the satisfaction in knowing the services were actually carried out (by me)

Cheers !!
 

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Very good advice, thank you for sharing in a civil way. I didn't know that about losing accuracy at the ends of the range, does that also apply to digital torque wrenches?
Your welcome, I'd hate for anyone to break the filter housing for the sake of not knowing that small piece of information, it's bound to be expensive.

Thats a very good question, I would have thought not but don't take that as gospel.
 

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There are two schools of thought on this. I personally like to do it with the engine stone cold and leave it to drain longer. Letting the engine warm up causes two effects which I don't like, 1. the oil is hot. 2. the oil has to drain from the top of the of engine which takes longer. This is my opinion and doing it hot/cold is just a matter of preference and shouldn't affect the end result. Consider that when a customer drives several miles to get to the garage it gets hot and I doubt the garage has time to let it fully cool down.
Thanks for your reply on this. My main concern was that doing it warm might cause some other problem that a complete novice such as myself wouldn't have considered :)
 

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As for the Dacia warranty, I called the head office and they said as long as I use genuine parts they will honour the warranty. Its worth calling them and asking about this though because it sounds like they made a record of my telephone conversation on their system as they took the vehicle registration and my address.
Just a thought, given the issues some people have had when dealing with Dacia CS, it might be an idea to se about getting something in writing, to this effect.
 

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Yep! I hardly ever trust other people to work on my cars for this reason. Our recent encounter with a bodyshop is a good example, whilst doing the oil change I noticed paint overspray on one of the headlights... :angry:
on the headlight... That'll be no fun to get off :-S , at least servicing yourself you would have been a bit more gentle with things than the butcher handed mechanics at the main dealers.
I suppose you'll get some that are careful, and some that are not, knowing my luck I know what I'll get.
 
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